Best Computer Technology Colleges in the U.S.

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Why a degree in computer technology?

To the naked eye, reading code is just as confusing as forming words in alphabet soup. But not to you. You’ve been on computers since the age of 2. And most likely, you could do more on a computer by high school than most people can by adulthood.

What computer technology degree options exist?

The computer and technology industry is filled with geniuses. With our growing dependency on technology, job growth is off the charts. Over the next eight years, technology positions are increasing by 12%-37%, depending on the job. That’s higher than any other field!* Even better, job security is almost a guarantee since 90% of Americans own at least one computerized device. Regardless of where you want to live, jobs will be available.

Whether you can build a computer, fix it, or program it, just know you’ve made elite status. You are beyond those of us who cross our fingers and hope a restart will fix our problems. You know the ins and outs of the machines we can’t live without. And now you’re just a few classes away from its limitless possibilities.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook
*Pew Internet and American Life project

Best Computer Technology Colleges in the U.S. for 2018

Rank School Name Location Description   Rating
1 University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA

University of Pennsylvania offers 17 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large city. In 2015, 479 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 264 Master's degrees, 194 Bachelor's degrees, 14 Doctoral degrees, and 7 Certificates degrees.

Based on 56 Reviews
2 Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD

Johns Hopkins University offers 16 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large city. In 2015, 555 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 466 Master's degrees, 48 Bachelor's degrees, 37 Certificates degrees, and 4 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 32 Reviews
3 Northwestern University Evanston, IL

Northwestern University offers 15 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a small city. In 2015, 206 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 149 Master's degrees, 53 Bachelor's degrees, 4 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 40 Reviews
4 Washington University in St Louis Saint Louis, MO

Washington University in St Louis offers 15 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large suburb. In 2015, 246 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 122 Bachelor's degrees, 77 Master's degrees, 28 Certificates degrees, and 19 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 36 Reviews
5 Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA

Carnegie Mellon University offers 28 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large city. In 2015, 1,273 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 959 Master's degrees, 263 Bachelor's degrees, and 51 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 16 Reviews
6 Cornell University Ithaca, NY

Cornell University offers 11 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a small city. In 2015, 525 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 272 Master's degrees, 238 Bachelor's degrees, and 15 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 100 Reviews
7 University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA

University of Southern California offers 11 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large city. In 2015, 826 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 674 Master's degrees, 112 Bachelor's degrees, 34 Doctoral degrees, and 6 Certificates degrees.

Based on 52 Reviews
8 Columbia University in the City of New York New York, NY

Columbia University in the City of New York offers 8 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large city. In 2015, 434 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 262 Master's degrees, 132 Bachelor's degrees, 26 Certificates degrees, and 14 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 20 Reviews
9 Yale University New Haven, CT

Yale University offers 6 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a mid sized city. In 2015, 79 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 48 Bachelor's degrees, 16 Master's degrees, 9 Certificates degrees, and 6 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 12 Reviews
10 New York University New York, NY

New York University offers 19 Computer Technology Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large city. In 2015, 906 students graduated in the study area of Computer Technology with students earning 714 Master's degrees, 169 Bachelor's degrees, 21 Doctoral degrees, 2 Certificates degrees.

Based on 60 Reviews

List of all Computer Technology Colleges in the U.S.

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  • Less than 2 years (below associate)
  • At least 2 but less than 4 years
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School Logo School Name Average tuition Student Teacher Ratio Enrolled Students
University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA
5/5
12 : 1 24,876
Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD
5/5
6 : 1 22,686
Northwestern University Northwestern University Evanston, IL
5/5
10 : 1 21,655
Washington University in St Louis Washington University in St Louis Saint Louis, MO
5/5
9 : 1 14,688
Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA
5/5
11 : 1 12,963
Cornell University Cornell University Ithaca, NY
5/5
12 : 1 21,904
University of Southern California University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA
5/5
16 : 1 43,401
Columbia University in the City of New York Columbia University in the City of New York New York, NY
5/5
7 : 1 28,086
Yale University Yale University New Haven, CT
5/5
5 : 1 12,385
New York University New York University New York, NY
5/5
8 : 1 50,027
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA
5/5
8 : 1 11,331
University of Virginia-Main Campus University of Virginia-Main Campus Charlottesville, VA
4/5
11 : 1 23,883
Stevens Institute of Technology Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, NJ
5/5
20 : 1 6,359
Stanford University Stanford University Stanford, CA
5/5
6 : 1 16,980
Harvard University Harvard University Cambridge, MA
5/5
14 : 1 29,652
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY
5/5
16 : 1 6,982
Brown University Brown University Providence, RI
5/5
12 : 1 9,458
Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
5/5
4 : 1 12,567
Northeastern University Northeastern University Boston, MA
5/5
15 : 1 19,940
Duke University Duke University Durham, NC
5/5
5 : 1 15,984
Tulane University of Louisiana Tulane University of Louisiana New Orleans, LA
5/5
12 : 1 12,485
Boston University Boston University Boston, MA
5/5
11 : 1 32,158
University of Chicago University of Chicago Chicago, IL
5/5
7 : 1 15,391
Lehigh University Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA
5/5
13 : 1 7,054
Dartmouth College Dartmouth College Hanover, NH
5/5
8 : 1 6,350

Find Local Colleges with Computer Technology Majors in the U.S.

Top Schools offering Computer Technology Degrees in the U.S.

Questions About Computer Technology Degrees

What are the different degrees I can get in computer technology?

Undergrads typically have a choice of earning either a Bachelor of Science degree or a Bachelor of Arts degree. While some schools award one or the other, some offer both options. The University of Colorado, for instance, awards a computer science BS through the College of Engineering and Applied Science and a BA through the College of Arts and Sciences. Good news: Employers value either. And while computer science remains a popular choice of major, some techies prefer to specialize. For example, at Dakota State University you can major in biology for information systems, business technology, computer education, cyber operations, health information administration, and more.

Graduate study increases marketability, especially for top-notch companies. It also hones skills necessary for particular careers, such as game programmers pursuing a master’s in educational technology. If you’re interested in becoming an administrator or manager, you may want to look into an MBA to develop your leadership skills.

What are some of the skills and experiences I will gain through computer technology?

Expect to learn the fundamentals of theory and application. You’ll likely be exposed to areas such as computer graphics, algorithms, database creation and management, software testing, and network building. And be prepared to become a creative problem-solver. Professionals in this discipline need to be able to keep up with advancements— computer technology and systems that can’t be taught directly now because they haven’t been developed yet! Your communication and collaboration skills will get a workout as coursework often involves teams of students designing solutions together. And if your school requires or recommends an internship, you’ll get to put your classroom skills to good use in a real workplace. Employers love to see resumes that include hands-on experience.

What are computer technology programs seeking in their applicants?

Have you built your own website? Or attended coding camp? You’re ahead of the game! As far as high school qualifications go, a strong performance in STEM courses will help get you accepted. At Georgia Tech, for instance, 94 percent of freshmen come in having taken AP Calculus or the equivalent. Better start cozying up to that TI-89. Likewise, high scores on the ACT and SAT (especially in math) bode well. And don’t discount the power of passion. Talk about your activities as president of your high school’s tech club or what you learned at summer computer camp.

Should I study computer technology online or on a campus?

If you thrive in group projects and want help in securing internships, an on-campus education may be for you. And the cutting-edge equipment and facilities universities offer can be hard to pass up. Dakota State University, for instance, has its own hands-on “hacking lab” where students can explore how hackers think, what tools they use, and how software vulnerabilities are identified and exploited – without putting their own computer or information at risk. Incredible opportunities exist for undergrads to pursue computer technology online as well though. So if you’re juggling other work and aren’t interested in a traditional collegiate experience, consider learning online. The real action, however, comes at the graduate level. Institutions realize that working professionals benefit from flexible continuing-education options, so offerings continue to expand. Virginia Tech, for example, offers an online master of information technology program conducted jointly by the Pamplin College of Business and the College of Engineering. And some employers may even pay part or all of your educational expenses because you’ll be a more valuable employee. Microsoft, for example, offers tuition and textbook reimbursement for approved work-related courses.

What are some cutting-edge careers in this industry?

Someone has to come up with all those apps for mobile devices and tablets, right? The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects employment of software developers to grow 17 percent between 2014 and 2024.* And since hardly a day goes by without news of a possible cyberattack, businesses of all sorts seek information security analysts. While you’re thwarting hackers, you’ll be building up your own bank account. Median salary in the field averages close to $43 per hour.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics

How do you work your way to the top in the computer technology industry?

A combination of education and experience can take you far, making internships during college a great first step on the career path. Research the degree(s) held by people holding your dream job. A bachelor’s may be sufficient for a data analyst, but information research scientists typically need a Ph.D. And plan on being a lifelong learner. Technology keeps advancing, and those who keep up with the changes fare the best.

Are there scholarships or grants available to people looking to computer technology?

The National Science Foundation and the Department of Homeland Security have teamed up for the CyberCorps Scholarship for Service Program for computer science degree seekers. It’s important to note though that recipients of these scholarships and hefty stipends must commit to holding a government position after graduation for a period equal to the years of support received. Similarly, winners of Microsoft scholarships covering full or partial tuition agree to complete an internship with the company. Not a bad deal! Students must be pursuing a four-year degree in computer science or a related STEM discipline to be eligible. Qualifications include merit, need, leadership, diversity, and excitement about the software industry.

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