Best Agriculture Colleges in the U.S.

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Why a degree in agriculture?

Growing up on a farm does a few things to you. You eat fresh grown vegetables, drive tractors, watch sunsets over the acreage, and don flannel on the regular. However, only about 10% of Americans are actual farmers*.

How to prepare for an agriculture degree

Believe it or not, there are more than 200 careers other than farming in the agriculture field: food science, purchasing, horticulture, and landscaping to name a few*. With such a large array of options, the job growth is varied. Some careers, such as food science, are increasing around 8%, while others, like farming, are seeing little to no jumps.

The increasing population is giving the agriculture business more mouths to feed. Some people hold doors open or volunteer their time. But you want to feed the people, and you are ready to work hard to do it. And if it all works out, a career in agriculture gives you permission to listen to all the country music you want with nobody to judge.

*Agriculture Council of America, Agriculture Careers
*Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook
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Best Agriculture Colleges in the U.S. for 2018

Rank School Name Location Description   Rating
1 Duke University Durham, NC

Duke University offers 16 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large private university in a mid sized city. In 2015, 148 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 84 Certificates degrees, 60 Master's degrees, and 4 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 24 Reviews
2 Cornell University Ithaca, NY

Cornell University offers 44 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large private university in a small city. In 2015, 762 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 612 Bachelor's degrees, 86 Master's degrees, and 64 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 100 Reviews
3 University of California-Berkeley Berkeley, CA
UC Berkeley

University of California-Berkeley offers 17 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large public university in a mid sized city. In 2015, 59 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 25 Bachelor's degrees, 21 Doctoral degrees, and 13 Master's degrees.

Based on 140 Reviews
4 Harvard University Cambridge, MA

Harvard University offers 3 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large private university in a mid sized city. In 2015, 22 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 22 Master's degrees.

Based on 44 Reviews
5 Stanford University Stanford, CA

Stanford University offers 2 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large suburb. In 2015, 19 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 13 Master's degrees, and 6 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 64 Reviews
6 Yale University New Haven, CT

Yale University offers 5 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large private university in a mid sized city. In 2015, 267 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 235 Master's degrees, 17 Doctoral degrees, and 15 Certificates degrees.

Based on 12 Reviews
7 University of California-Davis Davis, CA

University of California-Davis offers 35 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large public university in a small suburb. In 2015, 687 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 491 Bachelor's degrees, 119 Master's degrees, 75 Doctoral degrees, and 2 Certificates degrees.

Based on 92 Reviews
8 Columbia University in the City of New York New York, NY

Columbia University in the City of New York offers 3 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large private university in a large city. In 2015, 10 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 5 Doctoral degrees, 5 Certificates degrees.

Based on 20 Reviews
9 Princeton University Princeton, NJ

Princeton University offers 3 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a medium sized private university in a large suburb. In 2015, 63 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 45 Bachelor's degrees, 9 Master's degrees, and 9 Doctoral degrees.

Based on 28 Reviews
10 University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Ann Arbor, MI

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor offers 13 Agriculture Degree programs. It's a large public university in a mid sized city. In 2015, 89 students graduated in the study area of Agriculture with students earning 38 Bachelor's degrees, 25 Master's degrees, 19 Doctoral degrees, and 7 Certificates degrees.

Based on 128 Reviews

List of all Agriculture Colleges in the U.S.

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School Logo School Name Average tuition Student Teacher Ratio Enrolled Students
Duke University Duke University Durham, NC
5/5
5 : 1 15,984
Cornell University Cornell University Ithaca, NY
5/5
12 : 1 21,904
University of California-Berkeley University of California-Berkeley Berkeley, CA
3/5
21 : 1 38,189
Harvard University Harvard University Cambridge, MA
5/5
14 : 1 29,652
Stanford University Stanford University Stanford, CA
5/5
6 : 1 16,980
Yale University Yale University New Haven, CT
5/5
5 : 1 12,385
University of California-Davis University of California-Davis Davis, CA
3/5
15 : 1 35,186
Columbia University in the City of New York Columbia University in the City of New York New York, NY
5/5
7 : 1 28,086
Princeton University Princeton University Princeton, NJ
5/5
9 : 1 8,138
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Ann Arbor, MI
3/5
7 : 1 43,651
University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA
5/5
12 : 1 24,876
Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus University Park, PA
4/5
16 : 1 47,307
University of Florida University of Florida Gainesville, FL
2/5
20 : 1 50,645
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, IL
4/5
20 : 1 45,842
University of Connecticut University of Connecticut Storrs, CT
3/5
15 : 1 27,043
University of Chicago University of Chicago Chicago, IL
5/5
7 : 1 15,391
North Carolina State University at Raleigh North Carolina State University at Raleigh Raleigh, NC
3/5
19 : 1 34,015
Clemson University Clemson University Clemson, SC
3/5
20 : 1 22,698
California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo, CA
3/5
23 : 1 20,944
University Logo University of Georgia Athens, GA
3/5
18 : 1 36,130
University of Washington-Seattle Campus University of Washington-Seattle Campus Seattle, WA
3/5
12 : 1 45,408
Ohio State University-Main Campus Ohio State University-Main Campus Columbus, OH
3/5
15 : 1 58,663
Brown University Brown University Providence, RI
5/5
12 : 1 9,458
University of Wisconsin-Madison University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, WI
3/5
12 : 1 42,716
Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
5/5
4 : 1 12,567

Find Local Colleges with Agriculture Majors in the U.S.

Top Schools offering Agriculture Degrees in the U.S.

Questions About Agriculture Degrees

What are the different degrees I can get in Agriculture?

Whether you want to run the family farm or improve the state of world food production, an agriculture degree will guide you. While students can certainly pursue a traditional Bachelor of Science in agriculture, the diversification of the discipline means a range of possibilities for modern undergrads. Kansas State University, for instance, offers programs in agribusiness, agricultural communications and journalism, agricultural economics, agricultural education, agricultural technology management, agronomy, animal sciences and industry, bakery science and management, feed science and management, food science and industry, horticulture, milling science and management, park management and conservation, pre-veterinary medicine, and wildlife and outdoor enterprise management. Can’t decide on a major? Many universities encourage students to take general education and core agriculture classes during the first two years before settling on a specialty. It will take about 120 degree credits to earn a BS, but future prospects make it time well spent. Within six months of graduation, 98 percent of degree recipients from Iowa State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences had a job, enrolled in grad school, or joined the military.

If you’re interested in research such as genetics, the effect of dietary changes on animals, or improving water quality, look into a Master of Science degree. Requirements typically include a thesis and a final oral exam. Rather perfect your problem-solving and management skills? A Master of Agriculture (M.Agr.) degree might be your best bet. At some schools, the business and the agriculture departments combine to offer a Master of Agribusiness (MAB).

What are some of the skills and experiences I will gain through Agriculture?

Roll up your sleeves. Universities continue to emphasize hands-on training in the agriculture department. It gives students the chance to apply what they learn to real-world situations, and future employers take notice. For example, a capstone course at Iowa State University places seniors in charge of running the university’s diversified grain and livestock farm. Though students choose the committee on which they wish to work— such as building and grounds, crops, public relations, machinery, or finance— they quickly discover the need for collaboration to make the farm a success. You’ll have plenty of great stories to tell hiring managers about your role in managing 1,400 acres of crop land and 1,650 hogs!

What are agriculture programs seeking in their applicants?

Agricultural programs typically focus on science and math, so high school success and strong standardized test scores in these areas is a plus. Admissions officers also like to see excellent communication skills and evidence of leadership. If you were the president of your school’s environmental club, you’re on the right track. And be sure to highlight any practical experience. Working on your family’s farm and participating in 4-H shows you’re passionate about agriculture.

Should I study agriculture online or on a campus?

State-of-the-art labs and access to research opportunities draw many students to traditional campus experiences. Likewise, on-campus personnel can help with securing internships and finding a job after graduation. Many students enjoy the camaraderie of classrooms and the chance to participate in agriculture-related extracurriculars. Online courses, however, can be a great option, especially for those who live far from a university. Practicing farmers can deepen their knowledge while still fulfilling their obligations. Get a degree in agribusiness, earn a certificate in swine science, or become versed on the latest in seed technology.

What are some cutting-edge careers in this industry?

What a great time to be an aggie! Studies project nearly 60,000 high-skilled agriculture job openings annually in the United States with only 35,000 graduates available to fill them.* Hot employment markets include ecosystem managers, agricultural science and business educators, crop advisors, pest control specialists, plant scientists, sustainable biomaterials specialists, water resources engineers, and precision agriculture specialists.

*United States Department of Agriculture

How do you work your way to the top in the agriculture industry?

Education and experience provide a winning combination. Undergrads who take advantage of internships and study abroad opportunities often have a leg up when entering the job market. A student who has spent time learning about soils and crops in Costa Rica certainly reinforces her resume statement that she’s interested in global food production. Managerial and high-end research positions usually require advanced degrees. Everyone, however, should be prepared to keep up with developments in the field. People who can apply the latest technology or spot potential threats to the nation’s water supply will emerge as leaders.

Are there scholarships or grants available to people looking to study agriculture?

Start with Agriculture Future of America. Through its one application, you’ll become eligible for national and community scholarships. Qualifications include career vision, demonstration of leadership, and financial need. A longtime member of 4-H? Inquire with your local chapter and with your prospective educational institution about possible scholarships. And don’t forget the Dairy Farmers of America. Write a passionate essay about your desire to excel in the industry, and you may earn money toward your educational journey.

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